Episode 2: Let's See Where Curiosity Takes Us

 


 

Watering the garden of our curiosity can help us approach learning with an open mind and a desire to understand new concepts and ideas. So how do rhythms support us to live each day with curiosity? And what does a roving robotic vehicle on Mars have to do with it? Listen in, oh curious ones!


Links + resources from this episode:


***


This transcript was generated automatically and may not be 100 percent accurate.

EP0002 - Let's See Where Curiosity Takes Us
00:00:00:03 - 00:00:03:11
Hannah
Welcome to the Rhythms Podcast. My name's Hannah.

00:00:03:13 - 00:00:12:16
Kris
And my name's Kris. This is a podcast about exploring the rhythms, patterns and habits that bring joy and add richness to our everyday lives.

00:00:12:18 - 00:00:23:23
Hannah
From daily habits to embracing the changing seasons. It's not about mindless routines, but patterns with purpose. It's about making something special out of something ordinary.

00:00:24:00 - 00:00:38:14
Kris
If you're someone who wants to move beyond just being more efficient or productive and instead find ways to infuse your days with small, familiar moments that matter, then you've found two new friends with the same goal every episode.

00:00:38:15 - 00:01:02:11
Hannah
Listen. And as we share a reflection on the role of rhythms in our lives. Join the conversation as we unpack this idea further and then spend a moment with us. Considering how that rhythm could shape or add richness to our lives today. This is episode two. Let's say a curiosity takes us.

00:01:02:13 - 00:01:22:07
Kris
This is the moment when NASA's Curiosity rover touched down on Mars.

00:01:22:09 - 00:01:26:20
Audio Clip
UHF is good. Touchdown Confirmed. We’re safe. Let’s see where Curiosity will take us.

00:01:26:22 - 00:01:46:12
Kris
Right at the end of that clip is a quote that has stuck with me for a long time. It's time to see where Curiosity takes us. I want to explain why this moment is so magical to me and why it's left a profound impact on me as I seek to make the act of being curious. A rhythm of my life.

00:01:46:14 - 00:02:14:23
Kris
The rover was designed to explore the surface of Mars, gathering data and conducting experiments to help scientists better understand the planet's geology and for potential human existence. That's really easy to say on paper, but really, really think about it. The sheer absurd city, the sheer scale of the problems and engineering challenges that NASA overcame to achieve this vision is just stupidly enormous.

00:02:15:00 - 00:02:47:08
Kris
Well, like this. First, there's the distance. Mars is an average of about 225 million kilometers, or 140 million miles from Earth, which means it takes several months to travel there, even using the most efficient trajectory and launch windows. That is if the rover even gets off the ground. Countless hours and billions of dollars of R&D go into building rovers only to strap them onto a rocket that is, for all intents and purposes, a giant controlled bomb.

00:02:47:10 - 00:03:14:14
Kris
So you get the bomb into space and it's on its way to Mars, right? The further away the rocket travels, the hotter it gets to communicate with it. By the time Curiosity reached Mars, it took anywhere from 5 to 20 minutes for a radio transmission to get back to Earth. The whole time, during its flight to the Red Planet, Curiosity had to rely on Preprogramed pre thought out instructions to operate.

00:03:14:16 - 00:03:48:11
Kris
NASA had to anticipate nearly seven months worth of procedures just to cover navigation to Mars. The lack of real time communication made the landing the thing even harder. Landing on Mars is incredibly difficult due to its thin atmosphere, rendering traditional parachute ice on their own, insufficient for deceleration. Instead, Curiosity used a complex system of parachutes, rockets and a complicated sky crane maneuver to safely touch down on the planet's surface.

00:03:48:13 - 00:04:15:01
Kris
The kicker is that Mission Control wouldn't know if this was successful until 5 to 20 minutes later. But the rover landed. Hooray! Except it landed in a hellish desert landscape with extreme temperatures, high levels of radiation and dust storms that can last for months. Any era, any miscalculation or even a stroke of bad luck could have ended the mission at any point.

00:04:15:03 - 00:04:44:14
Kris
Despite all of this, it's still an operation to this day. Driving all over Mars, collecting and analyzing samples of Martian soil and rocks, studying the landscape and searching for signs of microbial life. So let's see where curiosity takes us. I've been reflecting on how curiosity is intertwined intimately with our sense of learning. I think curiosity is innate in all of us.

00:04:44:16 - 00:05:21:02
Kris
It's something that biologically moves us to our next phase of development. Maybe it's that we're wired to find sources of food, shelter and sustenance. You can see it in the innate curiosity of children as they navigate their way through their world, through experimentation. Questions, prodding and poking. It's a rhythm that's literally biologically hardwired into us, watering the garden of our curiosity can help us approach learning with an open mind and a desire to understand new concepts and ideas.

00:05:21:04 - 00:05:47:22
Kris
I feel like I've had to make an active choice to make learning less of a chore and more of a choice. I think a lot of this flows out of equating learning to achieving a grade or scoring a passing mark. It was definitely that way as I was growing up. Learning for me was never something that sparked joy, that stoked passion, or that piqued curiosity, especially if I didn't make the grade.

00:05:47:24 - 00:06:16:00
Kris
So it's only natural to move into adulthood carrying that baggage. I never found numbers easy. I consistently failed at maths and numbers in school and I think unfortunately that has influenced how I approach maths and numbers today because it was always about the grade and never the pursuit of interest. I think I've created an artificial wall to protect myself from something.

00:06:16:02 - 00:06:59:02
Kris
I'm not sure what it is exactly. Embarrassment, maybe. Well, whatever it is, it's a pattern that I've only just realized needs to break. It's confronting to think that something that you didn't find joy from when you were younger can prevent you in later years from being enriched by that same thing. But to shatter away your curiosity means to close yourself off from the richness and fullness of experience you get when you open your mind to curious thoughts and ideas by being curious about the world around us so we can become lifelong learners and continue to grow and develop throughout our lives.

00:06:59:04 - 00:07:32:24
Kris
I may not be good at numbers in maths, but I am opening myself up to learn about things to do with the subject that I find curious, interesting and important. The life of Srinivasa Ramanujan. The theories of Albert Einstein and the Mysteries of Space and Time. The incredible engineering of a mars Rover. I want to be the type of person who is growing out but never growing, while Curiosity can lead us into learning something new.

00:07:33:00 - 00:08:02:21
Kris
It comes with one inevitable caveat Failure during the development of the sky crane system, for instance, Nysa engineers encountered technical challenges and design issues that should have sunk the whole idea. From balancing issues to how to control its speed. Each path presented the potential for failure. The important lesson for me is that failure was an option. Sky Crane was incredibly risky.

00:08:02:21 - 00:08:32:05
Kris
It was untested. It had to compete against 100 safe ideas. But in the end, NASA's ability to embrace the possibility of failure led them to great success. It was the insatiable curiosity that gave them the ability to do so. Despite setbacks, NASA engineers persisted with the sky crane system, recognizing that it offered the best chance for a safe and precise landing on the Martian surface.

00:08:32:07 - 00:09:07:22
Kris
Their curiosity took them to the very cliff's edge of failure, close enough for them to fly or to fall. Witness the last time you let your curiosity carry you somewhere uncomfortable to a place where your views or your long held assumptions have been challenged. I wonder if that's such an uncomfortable place to be in because it challenges the deeply rooted rhythms we have established, ones that help us to feel safe and ones that give us something to ground ourselves to.

00:09:07:24 - 00:09:34:15
Kris
I wonder how much inner strength it really takes to break these rhythms. Giving myself permission to fail is one of the most pivotal moments of learning in my life. It completely changed the way I approach problems, knowing that failure is a valuable opportunity to learn only fuels my curiosity. How could I do better? What did I miss the first time?

00:09:34:17 - 00:10:03:08
Kris
Is there a skill I need to get to where I need to go in music? Rhythm is created not just by the notes we play, but the results in between. I think failure can be like those risks. They give us a chance to stop, reset and wait for the beat to continue. Failure has literally rewritten the rhythms that I thought I was preprogramed with.

00:10:03:10 - 00:10:40:12
Kris
You know what decisions are made and they can be unmade. And I think I have decided that I'm not passive in this, that I can make failure mean something if I'm curious enough and open enough to learn from it. Our curiosity is one of those things I think we take seriously for granted. It's a natural recurring part of our humanity, and yet it can so easily wither away and die if not given oxygen and sunlight, if it's not allowed to bloom and grow.

00:10:40:14 - 00:10:57:07
Kris
So where does Curiosity take us? Wherever we want to go. We only need to give ourselves permission to move.

00:10:57:09 - 00:11:22:21
Hannah
Okay. So I just love because children are the best human beings. There was a sixth grader who was that like 11 years old who named this amazing, incredible work that I don't know. Is it like thousands of people have worked on sending, creating and sending this robot to Mars? This is insane. And an 11 year old made the name like, famous and.

00:11:22:23 - 00:11:38:07
Kris
Yep. Clara. Clara ma from Kansas. I think it was. It was a contest. So Clara and everyone else who entered had to write an essay. And Clara's is really cool, and I'll post it on our.

00:11:38:07 - 00:11:39:22
Hannah
Website so you can read the essay.

00:11:39:24 - 00:11:53:04
Kris
It's really interesting. Yeah. Clara made a really great explanation of what curiosity meant, and I just loved it so much. I think it's so cool. And I think Clara's name is on the Rover as well. Wow. Oh.

00:11:53:06 - 00:12:09:19
Hannah
I love that. Okay, So tell me, where did this idea for your reflection come from? Because I'm, like, really intrigued when I think about rhythms. Curiosity isn't the first thing. They just popped into my head. But I think it's such a great thing to consider as we start looking at this. So, yeah, we do come from.

00:12:09:21 - 00:12:34:03
Kris
I'm a huge space geek. I remember as a kid I would on the back of an A4 sheet of paper, I would draw the solar system, so I would start on the on the left hand side and I and from one corner I draw like a parabola. And that would be the sun. I made the corners, yes. And then I do mercury and then getting slightly bigger, Venus and then Earth and then a little Mars.

00:12:34:03 - 00:12:35:15
Kris
And then I draw the asteroid belt.

00:12:35:15 - 00:12:40:08
Hannah
Oh, my God. I did the paper. I did not know this about, you know.

00:12:40:10 - 00:12:58:17
Kris
And then I do the big planets. So what's next? Jupiter, the big one. And I draw the big red dot on it as well. Saturn. I enjoyed drawing Saturn because they could do the rings. Jupiter. Saturn. Uranus was interesting too, because it was the other way around. Because Uranus orbits on its side, right?

00:12:58:17 - 00:12:59:02
Hannah
Yes.

00:12:59:02 - 00:13:11:04
Kris
So the rings of Saturn and Neptune was a bit boring because I couldn't remember any thing interesting about Neptune's appearance. And then back in those days, Hanna, back in my day, Pluto was a planet.

00:13:11:09 - 00:13:12:11
Hannah
Yes, I forget that.

00:13:12:11 - 00:13:30:04
Kris
It's a little thing. By the time I got the name Change and Pluto, the paper was getting real squishy. So it wasn't a scale. Anyway, I'm a huge space nerd, and so I loved following curiosity and watching its development and curiosity and learning, especially as something that's really important to me. Yeah.

00:13:30:04 - 00:13:56:19
Hannah
And I think that that's like fully come through in your reflections that maybe that's not always how you thought about yourself as someone who loved learning, but you're right. Like you're someone who I want to have on my quiz day who, if I have questions about something, well, I'll see if Chris knows, because I think also you're really good at learning, but you also are really good at breaking down a topic and explaining it to somebody else, which I think shows that you've learned it really well.

00:13:56:21 - 00:14:15:07
Kris
Thank you. I do enjoy learning. My brother in law once asked me what I thought I was really good at, and I thought for a second and I actually think I'm quite good at learning, which is sounds a bit narcissistic to say, but I think it's because I've figured out how to enjoy it.

00:14:15:09 - 00:14:29:13
Hannah
Curiosity then, obviously has become important to you as you have discovered that you love learning. You are Elena. You're good at learning. Where do you think it actually comes from? You kind of talked a little bit about this and your reflection, but how can we be more curious?

00:14:29:13 - 00:14:53:19
Kris
That's that's a hard question, isn't it? How do we put parameters on something that's intangible? But I talked about it being something that's biological. I think that we're born with a sense of having to find food and shelter and and out of that comes a sense of ingenuity. And I think that's a product of curiosity, because our ancestors needed shelter and they needed to learn how to wield the tools to make that.

00:14:53:19 - 00:15:14:06
Kris
And somewhere in that process would have been, I wonder what happens if I bang this against this or if I wonder if I do this. And I think those two words, I wonder, are the start of curiosity. Yeah. And you obviously, as a early childhood teacher would say that, wouldn't you say that develop in real life?

00:15:14:11 - 00:15:33:08
Hannah
Well, actually, just when you say the words, I wonder, like you will hear an early childhood teacher say those words so many times in a day. But yeah, and I think just in general, as early childhood teachers, we have to be very curious ourselves because we're trying to understand the children who are in our care and what they're learning, how they're learning.

00:15:33:13 - 00:15:52:16
Hannah
And of course, with the end, we save the epitome of curiosity. And I think, like you're saying, as a very natural posture, I believe maybe we get trained a little bit out of it and we'll talk about that. You reference to that and your affliction. But generally, we are really curious beings.

00:15:52:17 - 00:16:05:04
Kris
Do you do that on purpose as as a teacher? Do use an open ended question like I wonder. Yes. To develop that sense of, well, maybe you should think of what you think this means.

00:16:05:05 - 00:16:29:09
Hannah
It's exactly that. So we don't want to rob a child of an opportunity to learn something for themselves. And so if we it's funny because we call ourselves teachers, right? And of course, there's a role of what we do. There's an aspect of what we do that is teaching. But the main reason that we're there is to support children, to learn and there's a difference, a big difference between teaching and learning.

00:16:29:09 - 00:16:53:08
Hannah
There's a gap. Yes. And so when we say I wonder, we prompt a child to consider and assess and evaluate and problem solve and research and experiment. And there's so many things that a child hopefully, if they feel ready and a learning state, will go and do in their mind and maybe in the physical world to go and discover for themselves.

00:16:53:08 - 00:16:58:17
Hannah
And when you learn something for yourself, I believe that's always more powerful than somebody teaching it to you.

00:16:58:17 - 00:17:31:06
Kris
Yes, 100%. I agree. I feel like I've learned more in the last ten years than as a self-directed learner than I had in formal education. And formal education is great. I'm not knocking that. And the idea of being at school is a good it's a good set of rhythms to to set you up for learning. But and I don't know if this is because we're slightly older or that teaching practices have changed, but certainly when I was growing up, as I said, it was never about the joy of discovering and learning.

00:17:31:07 - 00:17:42:08
Kris
It was about grades and always about the achievement of placing or getting the A or the the 100 out of 100 and never about the joy of discovering something new.

00:17:42:08 - 00:18:12:16
Hannah
Yeah. And so what is really interesting and I think exciting as we are starting to see in some areas a push towards more child or student led learning and it's that idea that we've come in as educators and had a list of things that we think a student should learn, and we have crafted the strategies for teaching and hopefully learning that what f students and children directed and steered their own learning, that that would be more powerful and more interesting.

00:18:12:16 - 00:18:32:08
Hannah
We would work more and the strengths and gifts and skillset of the child and an early childhood education in New Zealand. Actually, we've been embracing that way of learning for a number of years. Our curriculum for early childhood is called the fabric, and that is the foundation really is that we want children to become lifelong loonies.

00:18:32:09 - 00:18:51:09
Kris
I like what you said about strength based learning because I think that's so true. You're pigeonholed a little bit into having to learn things that aren't necessarily within maybe your brain's not wired in a certain way, or you just don't find things interesting. That was me with maths, you know, I just my brain just went into spasms because it couldn't deal with it.

00:18:51:09 - 00:19:18:02
Kris
And so I think I self-guided my way into the arts and gravitated there because I did well at it. I got the, I thought the grades, but I also felt validated and that actually know this is where I'm meant to be or supposed to be. And it's only now, as I'm reflecting purposefully that I'm realizing I actually I am allowed a seat at the table of stem of mathematics and science and engineering in this way, just because maybe I can do the sums or maybe my brain's not wired that way.

00:19:18:03 - 00:19:31:17
Kris
I can still take enjoyment from this field. Yeah, and I have I've learned so much cool stuff following curiosity and what NASA's doing. And so you should definitely take a look at the Instagram because some of the photos that they post are incredible.

00:19:31:17 - 00:19:50:07
Hannah
Yeah. Wow. So I will go and look at the forest because I think it will be amazing and hopefully it would like Spark. Well, not hopefully it may spark a bit of curiosity for me. I don't I'm not actually someone who is that interested in Mars and space. That's not like something I've been naturally drawn to, but I love.

00:19:50:07 - 00:20:14:04
Hannah
Yeah, like what you're saying is something like that does draw you into a field of learning. And I think that that's what, that's what I love about what you've put out in your application is that curiosity is the spark and the drive that leads us to exploring and experimenting, and from that comes genuine learning. So you talked about learning and new experiences, though, can be quite unsettling.

00:20:14:04 - 00:20:23:17
Hannah
Why do you think that is? Why, for you in the past has a learning and new experience has been unsettling or uncomfortable?

00:20:23:17 - 00:20:51:18
Kris
Yeah, I think because firstly that sense of imposter syndrome, like maybe you don't belong here or there, but also on reflecting about curiosity and you talked about it being a spark. A spark can be really helpful to light a fire when you're cold, but it can also burn down a forest. In the back of my mind was the idea that rhythms like curiosity can be good, but they can also lead us into places that unhealthy.

00:20:51:18 - 00:21:26:07
Kris
And specifically thinking about online echo chambers and, you know, the YouTube rabbit hole that people can fall down where their curiosity is innocent and well-placed. But then as tuned into something maybe that's not good for them or maybe doesn't serve them well, Part of curiosity that's unsettling for me is that it can, in a helpful way, ask you or confront you with rhythms that you have imprinted on yourself or had imprinted onto you that can also expose you to things that might not serve you well.

00:21:26:10 - 00:21:48:05
Kris
And it takes, I think, a supreme amount of introspection and understanding of yourself, and particularly self-awareness around the place you're in mentally, I think is really important. And that's really difficult. So that's part of the reason why I think curiosity can be a little bit unsettling because it can lead us down tracks that are a little bit dangerous sometimes.

00:21:48:05 - 00:22:12:17
Hannah
Yeah, for sure. I think that idea actually is a little bit new to me. I haven't thought about that, but I think that that is so true that that can be something that's frightening about learning. And I think we've definitely seen that in the past. But I think what really resonated for me as well and what you talked about as that idea of failure is terrifying, especially for I like to call myself a recovering perfectionist.

00:22:12:17 - 00:22:34:02
Hannah
Sometimes I lean way more on the perfectionist side than the recovering side. But for someone who really desires to do everything perfectly the first time learning something new, stepping outside of what I know and now I can do it is really uncomfortable. And I was like trying to think more about like, Well, why is that? And because we don't want to be exposed.

00:22:34:02 - 00:23:01:04
Hannah
We don't want to be hurt. We don't want you know, you talked about that idea of we need to protect ourselves. And so what I just loved and like latched on to in that idea is rhythms being such an important component. Then in learning and curiosity, because rhythms alongside relationships and empowerment and empowerment and things help us to feel safe and secure because they're familiar and they hold us through uncertainty.

00:23:01:08 - 00:23:24:06
Hannah
And it made me think so you've got me, you as my early childhood teacher back on that. When we think about like the hierarchy of needs before we ever get to a point where we can learn something new, we can experiment and feel comfortable and confident and new experiences before any of that is safety and security. And that's one thing that supports that familiar rhythms.

00:23:24:11 - 00:23:50:16
Kris
That's so true. And I keep thinking of the image of a house and especially a foundation. So when you're building, obviously you want really strong foundations before you do anything because you put a house up on bed foundations, it's going to fall down and rhythms are kind of like that bedrock, consistent and not unchanging, but fairly static elements of your life that you can really build strong housing on.

00:23:50:18 - 00:23:56:04
Kris
And I like that idea. I like that idea that they provide us safety and security.

00:23:56:04 - 00:24:18:04
Hannah
Yeah, I think even things that aren't serving us because they're familiar, you're right, even though they are not helping us to be, we want to be potentially they're helping us to be someone we don't want to be that familiar and that safety is hard to walk away from. As I've been considering your reflection, I've wondered what can you do about an undesirable rhythm of life?

00:24:18:09 - 00:24:33:13
Kris
Hmm. Well. Well, you know, with a house, you can't build a house in one day. And especially you can't. You can't pull foundations or dig foundations. And one day, I think the idea of a rhythm is that it actually forces us to slow down.

00:24:33:15 - 00:24:34:01
Hannah
Yeah.

00:24:34:04 - 00:24:50:20
Kris
And a rhythm has to be methodical. It has to be consistent over time for it to build muscle, you know, to support us. It needs to be something that's exercised over time and that gets stronger over time. And that happens slowly, doesn't it? Well, I think I think slowly.

00:24:50:20 - 00:25:11:16
Hannah
And I think it's reminding me of what we talked about in our first episode. And if you haven't listened to that yet, you might like to go back and have a listen. But we talked about, well, how do you even create a rhythm? And that idea of actively listening to yourself? And I think that that comes in here, it's that slowing down, noticing and observing, being able to identify, actually, this isn't serving me.

00:25:11:16 - 00:25:39:12
Hannah
Okay, Well, why is that? Because I want to be this in life. I want to have this as an element of my life. Well, I want to be this this value is important to me. And that's not coming through when I live with rhythms in this way, whatever, you fill in the blank there. So what my input into my life, what would help me to bring those things up, You know, when we start asking ourselves these questions, then alternative ways of living in the NG start to become more evident.

00:25:39:12 - 00:25:57:08
Hannah
Then we actually into end to this learning process learning cycle that we're sort of talking about here in terms of curiosity as we actually just have to try something out. And so we have to be unafraid to try something. And again, it might not work. That might not be the right rhythm for us. It might not actually what we thought was helpful, it's not helpful.

00:25:57:10 - 00:26:26:06
Hannah
There are a lot of learning theories and models. If you've done any sort of education, you probably are aware of that. But a lot of them boil down to this idea of performing an experiment and then noticing, making observations about it, assessing what's taken place, what the results were, then integrate that learning and repeating. So performing another experiment and I think we have to give ourselves, like you're talking about, we have to give ourselves permission and time to do that.

00:26:26:09 - 00:26:46:15
Kris
Yeah, and I think such an important tool and that and I don't think I can emphasize enough as being self-aware I think is so important. It's like a foundational. I keep saying using that metaphor, I hope beating it to death, but having a self-awareness about yourself is something you can control. And it's a sense In a sense it is active listening.

00:26:46:15 - 00:27:16:02
Kris
You're just doing it inward and you're actively listening to what your mind and your body and your environment and your context is saying to you. And being self aware makes accepting failure easier. It helps. It takes the sting out of it because failure doesn't stay one dimensional. It doesn't stay as I let myself down. And that's the end of self-awareness as a tool that allows you to mine that feeling.

00:27:16:02 - 00:27:35:10
Kris
You know, it's a little, little pickax. You can pick away at it. Go Look, I let myself down. Why? Well, because maybe I wasn't in a good mood. Or maybe. Maybe I wasn't prepared or I didn't study enough. Whatever. What can I do about that and see how that little spark of curiosity can apply? And to something like failure?

00:27:35:11 - 00:27:50:04
Hannah
Yeah. What I'm thinking as you say that as well as like that, like little pickax going. And it's almost like every time it's heading, it's saying and, and, and, and, and eventually you get to the bottom and you're still there and you still okay.

00:27:50:04 - 00:28:10:19
Kris
Yeah. And the failure still exists that the pickax is not going to take away the failure that still exists. But it gives it more meaning, it gives it more weight. It gives it more than just a one dimensional feeling of I let myself down or I let others down. And that's where we learn.

00:28:10:21 - 00:28:20:22
Hannah
And when you're talking about weight, I guess it brings meaning and signifier counts as sort of another idea, I think, as well as by doing that, you can actually remove some of the burden of it.

00:28:20:22 - 00:28:21:11
Kris
Yes.

00:28:21:15 - 00:28:38:22
Hannah
So maybe it doesn't actually feel so heavy. It doesn't weigh so heavily on you. When I understand that more, it doesn't actually weigh so heavily. And I'm actually in that place in where I can go. Okay. And so what? And we kind of we go back to the start of the cycle.

00:28:38:23 - 00:29:03:02
Kris
Yeah. And I've I've felt that tangibly. I'll tell you a story about the time we bought our house and we moved in and we had awful exit walls in the lounge. So it was like in the awful movie Pinky and I swear there was like a bit of sparkle in there as well. I do not know what the owners are thinking, but anyway, your dad and your family came in like.

00:29:03:02 - 00:29:04:17
Kris
I mean, were you there? Did he help us paint?

00:29:04:17 - 00:29:13:18
Hannah
I, I was once not allowed to paint walls, and now I've stuck very strongly to that, that I am not a painter of walls.

00:29:13:20 - 00:29:35:22
Kris
You know, your dad helped us to paint this war. I took three coats, but we got the world on, and I was putting up our TV. It was a frame TV, and so it has a special wall mount. And I was very nervous because was this freshly painted wall. And I put holes into where I thought the bracket should go, and I just completely messed it up.

00:29:35:22 - 00:29:58:24
Kris
I think I missed all of the studs. I went straight into the chip board, the drywall, and in that moment it really hit me the sense of, oh, I've I've ruined this wall, You know, it was pristine, it was so clean. And it took me a while to accept the idea that actually, no, this is my wall. Like I had paid plenty of money for it.

00:29:58:24 - 00:30:20:09
Kris
If you tried to buy a house in New Zealand, allowing myself firstly to be introspective enough to realize, actually this is not as big a deal as I'm making it out to be, disarming that sense of failure and mining it and thinking about what am I learning from this? I'm learning that maybe I need to do more preparation, I need to find the studs or whatever.

00:30:20:10 - 00:30:22:20
Kris
So that's a really tangible example for me.

00:30:22:20 - 00:30:32:06
Hannah
And I know we've talked about this before that actually you feel like you are a little bit different now about learning and trying new things from that moment, right?

00:30:32:10 - 00:31:03:09
Kris
Yes. So now I would feel so much more confident putting up something like that because I've given myself permission to mess it up. I don't want to mess it up. That's not the point. I still want to succeed at the task, but taking away the burden, like you said, the weight of the responsibility towards Edwards, of getting it right and instead enjoying the process, whatever it is and relishing it when it does finally work is so much more satisfying.

00:31:03:09 - 00:31:26:10
Hannah
So when you're talking, it's reminding me I'm part of this online community. It's about like interior design. It's called the cozy, minimalist community. The woman who started this community and way of thinking, she says, Why are we scared to make holes in our walls? It's just a hole. You can fill it. If it's a little like pinhole. But some of us even ski to like put a pen in the wall in case, but in the wrong place.

00:31:26:10 - 00:31:45:18
Hannah
You could just put a tiny bit of chalk on it. You're never going to find that hole like, Yeah. And so it's like fear, fear, fear, fear, fear. Stopping us from trying things and doing things. So I really like that She also has this whole process that you go through for doing a room, making a room that feels like cozy for you.

00:31:45:18 - 00:32:10:16
Hannah
And part of the process is to quiet the room. And I think again, I like that this is tied into some of our thoughts here as that is that quiet hang. You got this like sort of introspective moment as you thought about why is this such a big deal that I've made a hole in the wall that quieting, noticing, observing that brings us to a place where we can go and learn and try new things and be successful in our failure.

00:32:10:22 - 00:32:26:13
Hannah
If you want to know more, we'll put in the show notes where you can find more about the cozy Melissa. You know, you can find Michael and Smith on Instagram. You can also find us there. Just remember that. Yeah, it's a really cool company to be part of. I'm learning a lot. And even just that idea of you can lay out your room, you can try something and if you hate it, you could.

00:32:26:13 - 00:32:45:08
Kris
Jaded Yeah, it's curiosity, right? It's this sense of freeing yourself to ask why something can be done a certain way. And that's how a mars rover gets strapped on to a tank full of rocket fuel. Blasted into our atmosphere. That's how that gets to Mars.

00:32:45:08 - 00:32:47:04
Hannah
Yeah, let's just say. Yeah.

00:32:47:06 - 00:33:15:17
Kris
A room of 100 people or more. Thousands of people. Just keep asking, Oh, why not? And we haven't talked about it, Hannah. But the sky Crane I'm going to put a video on the Shownotes and on our site because it is the most incredible dance of machinery. Wow. You'll see. Okay. And that's a product of people just going, Well, why can't we launch the rover on a tether and land it by remote control 200 million miles away?

00:33:15:23 - 00:33:28:04
Kris
Why not? And that's curiosity to me. That's the essence of it, is there's always more to learn and understand when we ask more, when we ask deeper, when we mind at the question with a pickax.

00:33:28:06 - 00:33:58:14
Hannah
What we're talking about is that rhythms actually are some of the foundation like we're saying that we need to be able to enter into this cycle of learning, the cycle of failing and failing and succeeding and experimenting and trying and asking for the millionth time. Well, let's just say, and then following where the breadcrumbs go. And so rhythms then are that firm foundation that help us to be steady and secure.

00:33:58:14 - 00:34:24:06
Hannah
And it's in that place that we can enter into the learning cycle. Rhythms also can help us to quiet and listen and assess, reflect, and that then also sparks curiosity as we follow again, those leads that come from listening and trying to understand. So as, you know, the last question we always want to ask each other on this podcast as well.

00:34:24:06 - 00:34:44:16
Hannah
What so what about this wake or this fortnight or even just today? What something then how can a rhythm support us and our quest to be curious, to be learning to explore the world and to go outside of our comfort zones, to explore and discover what's a rhythm that could support you?

00:34:44:17 - 00:35:03:22
Kris
Yeah, this isn't going to be a hugely significant one, but I think it's a fun one and I want to challenge everyone who's listening to do it with me as well. I think I'm going to be intentionally curious this week and what I'm going to do is every day I'm going to go onto Wikipedia and I'm going to click, read a random article, and I'm going to do that five times.

00:35:03:23 - 00:35:04:06
Hannah
Is that.

00:35:04:06 - 00:35:36:22
Kris
About it? Absolutely, there is. And I've done it before and you might just get junk, but to me that just shows me how much there is out there to learn. And so I'm going to do that. I'm going to do that every day for this week. I'm going to read five random Wikipedia articles, and to me it's something small, but it's a really fun way to practice the rhythm of being curious and then as well just being self aware and being introspective and the day to day things, asking yourself and being aware of why do I do this this way?

00:35:36:22 - 00:35:55:00
Kris
Why do I walk on the side of the street? Why do I cross the road here and not further up the street? That's the sort of mindset I want to have, is examining what are the rhythms that make up my life and why do I do them. That's that's that's a very simple conclusion, But I think that's what I want to do.

00:35:55:00 - 00:36:14:14
Hannah
Well, that's what rhythms are, right as they are those little ordinary, everyday moments that we turn into familiar loveliness. And those are the things that carry us and that make up our lives. For me, I think I have a rhythm that I want to have embedded in my life that I have not been very successful and inspiring in my life.

00:36:14:14 - 00:36:31:14
Hannah
Yet. I have this journal. It's called The Next Thing Journal. It's a bad decision making, but it really helps you to reflect on your life, things you love. Things have been hard decisions that you're making, and it boils down to things like asking, Well, what are the questions that you're asking? What Questions are you carrying? What arrows are you discovering?

00:36:31:14 - 00:36:48:14
Hannah
You don't even have to have a full answer about what arrows? So it helps me to listen to myself. And I haven't yet found like a time in my week where it really works to do that, where I am going to enjoy the process of doing it. So I'm like a little bit behind and I feel stress about it and that's not the point of it.

00:36:48:14 - 00:37:06:06
Hannah
I mean to sit down and enjoy doing this. So for me, my rhythm that I want to try and find this week is whereabouts of my week. Can I make time to really savor that experience? Because that's going to help me know more about me. It's going to help me be curious about myself and curious about what could be.

00:37:06:06 - 00:37:09:18
Hannah
And that's, I'm sure, going to lead to more beautiful life giving, rather And.

00:37:09:18 - 00:37:24:14
Kris
I can't wait to hear about them to be curious. It's so fun. It's so fun to learn about something new and to be excited about something again. Maybe there's something in your life that you thought you weren't good at, but you just stopped asking why.

00:37:24:20 - 00:37:41:09
Hannah
And can I also say, Chris, we've talking today about learning and being curious, and I just wanna say thanks to you because I'm learning so much of this process of putting this together. And this really was about you being curious about like, well, what would it look like? Is this something that you and I could even do? Would people listen and could we make it sound good?

00:37:41:11 - 00:37:47:08
Hannah
Which obviously with you, we can. So thank you for that. And also, we want to hear from people, don't we, Chris?

00:37:47:09 - 00:37:55:05
Kris
Absolutely. You can find us online at it's rhythms dot com. It's our wired msnbc.com found us on our socials of course on insta.

00:37:55:05 - 00:38:18:03
Hannah
And make sure you post on socials what other things that you have been learning. What are the things that you're curious about? And also of course, what are the rhythms that are holding you and carrying you through as you go and do those new things have new uncomfortable experiences where you fail to fail and eventually find success and your failure, the failure can be success.

00:38:18:05 - 00:38:52:21
Kris
Absolutely. All right. See you later. They thanks for listening to the Rhythms podcast for show notes, episode transcripts and more. Remember, it's our way to embrace. Com that's its rhythms. Dot com. If you enjoyed today's episode, don't forget to subscribe, write and review on your favorite platform. It really helps us out. We want to hear from you. If there's a rhythm in your life you want us to talk about or a question you'd like to ask us about this episode or any others, get in touch.

00:38:52:23 - 00:39:06:21
Kris
You can email us at the Rhythms Podcast at gmail.com. You can DM us on Instagram at It's Rhythms Podcast, or if you're listening on Spotify, make sure to use the Q&A feature. See you next time on the Rhythms podcast.

Comments

Popular Posts